Gov. Mark Dayton collapsed during his State of the State address

Mark Dayton recovering after collapsing during his State of the State address

By David Montgomery and Rachel E. Stassen-Berger
PUBLISHED: January 23, 2017 at 7:51 pm | UPDATED: January 24, 2017 at 12:24 pm
at twincities.com

Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton collapses while giving his annual State of the State Address in the House Chambers of the State Capitol in St. Paul, Monday, January 23, 2017. Dayton had tripped earlier in the evening before heading to the podium. (Pioneer Press: Scott Takushi)

Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton collapses while giving his annual State of the State Address in the House Chambers of the State Capitol in St. Paul, Monday, January 23, 2017. Dayton had tripped earlier in the evening before heading to the podium. (Pioneer Press: Scott Takushi)

UPDATE: Gov. Mark Dayton has prostate cancer, says he is able to do the job

Gov. Mark Dayton collapsed during his State of the State address Monday evening in front of an assembled audience of lawmakers, state officials and Minnesotans.

The 69-year-old Dayton fainted 45 minutes into the speech before a joint session of the Legislature at the state Capitol in St. Paul. After spending several minutes on the ground in the House chamber, he walked into a back room with assistance. His staff later said that he returned home, was evaluated by medics and is planning to deliver his biennial budget on Tuesday.

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Otto Heinrich Warburg

Taken from Wikipedia, on August 2, 2016
Otto Heinrich Warburg,  (October 8, 1883 – August 1, 1970), son of physicist Emil Warburg, was a German physiologist, medical doctor and Nobel laureate. He served as an officer in the elite Uhlan (cavalry regiment) during the First World War, and was awarded the Iron Cross (1st Class) for bravery. Warburg is considered one of the 20th century’s leading biochemists.He was the sole recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1931. In total, he was nominated for the award 47 times over the course of his career.

Otto_WarburgBiography
Warburg’s father, Emil Warburg, was a member of the illustrious Warburg family of Altona, and had converted to Christianity reportedly after a disagreement with his Conservative Jewish parents. Emil was also president of the Physikalische Reichsanstalt, Wirklicher Geheimer Oberregierungsrat (True Senior Privy Counselor). His mother was the daughter of a Protestant family of bankers and civil servants from Baden.

Warburg studied chemistry under the famous Emil Fischer, and earned his Doctor of Chemistry in Berlin in 1906. He then studied under Ludolf von Krehl, and earned the degree of Doctor of Medicine in Heidelberg in 1911.

Between 1908 and 1914, Warburg was affiliated with the Naples Marine Biological Station, in Naples, Italy, where he conducted research. In later years, he would return for visits, and maintained a lifelong friendship with the family of the station’s director, Anton Dohrn.

A lifelong equestrian, he served as an officer in the elite Uhlans (cavalry) on the front during the First World War, where he won the Iron Cross. Warburg later credited this experience with affording him invaluable insights into “real life” outside the confines of academia. Towards the end of the war, when the outcome was unmistakable, Albert Einstein, who had been a friend of Warburg’s father Emil, wrote Warburg at the behest of friends, asking him to leave the army and return to academia, since it would be a tragedy for the world to lose his talents. Einstein and Warburg later became friends, and Einstein’s work in physics had great influence on Otto’s biochemical research.[citation needed]

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Rudolf Virchow

Taken from Wikipedia

Rudolf Ludwig Carl Virchow, (October 1821 – September 5, 1902), was a German physician, anthropologist, pathologist, prehistorian, biologist, writer, editor, and politician, known for his advancement of public health. He is known as “the father of modern pathology” because his work helped to discredit humourism, bringing more science to medicine. He is also known as the founder of social medicine and veterinary pathology, and to his colleagues, the “Pope of medicine”.

Rudolf_VirchowBorn and lived in Schievelbein (Świdwin) as an only child of a working-class family, he proved to be a brilliant student. Dissuaded by his weak voice, he abandoned his initial interest in theology and turned to medicine. With special military scholarship, he earned his medical degree from Friedrich-Wilhelms Institute (Humboldt University of Berlin) under the tutelage of Johannes Peter Müller. He worked at the Charité hospital under Robert Froriep, whom he eventually succeeded as the prosector.

Although he failed to contain the 1847–1848 typhus epidemic in Upper Silesia, his report laid the foundation for public health in Germany, as well as his political and social activities. From it, he coined a well known aphorism: “Medicine is a social science, and politics is nothing else but medicine on a large scale”. He participated in the Revolution of 1848, which led to his expulsion from Charité the next year. He published a newspaper Die medicinische Reform (Medical Reform) during this period to disseminate his social and political ideas. He took the first Chair of Pathological Anatomy at the University of Würzburg in 1849. After five years, Charité invited him back to direct its newly built Institute for Pathology, and simultaneously becoming the first Chair of Pathological Anatomy and Physiology at Berlin University. The campus of Charité is now named Campus Virchow Klinikum. He cofounded the political party Deutsche Fortschrittspartei, by which he was elected to the Prussian House of Representatives, and won a seat in the Reichstag. His opposition to Otto von Bismarck’s financial policy resulted in an anecdotal “Sausage Duel” between the two. But he ardently supported Bismarck in his anti-Catholic campaigns, the social revolution he himself named as Kulturkampf (“culture struggle”).

A prolific writer, his scientific writings alone exceeded 2,000 in number. Among his books, Cellular Pathology published in 1858 is regarded as the root of modern pathology. This work also popularised the third dictum in cell theory: Omnis cellula e cellula (“All cells come from cells”); although his idea originated in 1855. He founded journals such as Archiv für pathologische Anatomie und Physiologie und für klinische Medizin (now Virchows Archiv), and Zeitschrift für Ethnologie (Journal of Ethnology). The latter is published by German Anthropological Association and the Berlin Society for Anthropology, Ethnology and Prehistory, the societies of which he also founded.

Virchow was the first to precisely describe and give names of diseases such as leukemia, chordoma, ochronosis, embolism, and thrombosis. He coined scientific terms, chromatin, agenesis, parenchyma, osteoid, amyloid degeneration, and spina bifida. His description of the transmission cycle of a roundworm Trichinella spiralis established the importance of meat inspection, which was started in Berlin. He developed the first systematic method of autopsy involving surgery of all body parts and microscopic examination. A number of medical terms are named after him, including Virchow’s node, Virchow–Robin spaces, Virchow–Seckel syndrome, and Virchow’s triad. He was the first to use hair analysis in criminal investigation, and recognised its limitations. His laborious analyses of the hair, skin, and eye colour of school children made him criticise the Aryan race concept as a myth.

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Team of sleuths stalks cancer in L.A. County

by Soumya Karlamangla Contact Reporter, LA Times
November 11, 2015

Cancer Sleuth

Dennis Deapen directs the Los Angeles County Cancer Surveillance Program. (Katie Falkenberg / Los Angeles Times)

Three men hunch over a table, scrutinizing a document. Maps paper the walls around them.

The moment, captured in a black-and-white photograph, marks the beginning of a quest to catch a villain.

For more than four decades, this team has been stalking the killer’s every move, trying to identify patterns of attack. They collect and store evidence, filling drawers and file cabinets.

In the late 1960s, university scientists began the Los Angeles County Cancer Surveillance Program, one of the oldest such registries in the world.

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Santa Rosa doctor journeys outside U.S. to practice new prostate cancer treatment

By GUY KOVNER
THE PRESS DEMOCRAT
March 23, 2014, 3:27 PM

Santa Rosa urologist Dr. Michael Lazar uses ultrasound waves that function as an 'acoustic scalpel' to treat prostate cancer in patients in Mexico. The procedure is undergoing clinical trials in the U.S. (Conner Jay / The Press Democrat)

Santa Rosa urologist Dr. Michael Lazar uses ultrasound waves that function as an ‘acoustic scalpel’ to treat prostate cancer in patients in Mexico. The procedure is undergoing clinical trials in the U.S. (Conner Jay / The Press Democrat)

When Dr. Michael Lazar makes weekend trips to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, it’s for business — to use a high-tech device to treat men with prostate cancer.

Lazar, a Santa Rosa urologist for 30 years, is the only Northern California physician regularly treating patients with high-intensity focused ultrasound, known as HIFU, which is currently not approved for use in the United States.

But HIFU, used for a decade or more in other countries, is “hands-down,” Lazar said, the best treatment for prostate cancer, the most non-skin common cancer in men and second only to lung cancer in deaths.

HIFU is the only non-invasive and radiation-free treatment for the disease, which was diagnosed in nearly 240,000 American men last year and caused almost 30,000 deaths, Lazar said.

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