Hippocates

“People think that epilepsy is divine simply because they don’t have any idea what causes epilepsy. But I believe that someday we will understand what causes epilepsy, and at that moment, we will cease to believe that it’s divine. And so it is with everything in the universe”
Hippocrates

A conventionalized image in a Roman "portrait" bust (19th-century engraving) Native name Ἱπποκράτης Born c. 460 BC Kos, Ancient Greece Died c.370 BC Larissa, Ancient Greece Ethnicity Greek Occupation Physician Era Classical Greece Title: The Father of Western Medicine

Hippocrates of Kos A conventionalized image in a Roman “portrait” bust (19th-century engraving)
Native name Ἱπποκράτης
Born c. 460 BC
Kos, Ancient Greece
Died c.370 BC
Larissa, Ancient Greece
Ethnicity Greek
Occupation Physician
Era Classical Greece
Title: The Father of Western Medicine

Hippocrates of Kos (/hɪˈpɒkrəˌtiːz/; Greek: Ἱπποκράτης; Hippokrátēs; c. 460 – c. 370 BC), also known as Hippocrates II, was a Greek physician of the Age of Pericles (Classical Greece), and is considered one of the most outstanding figures in the history of medicine. He is referred to as the “Father of Western Medicine” in recognition of his lasting contributions to the field as the founder of the Hippocratic School of Medicine. This intellectual school revolutionized medicine in ancient Greece, establishing it as a discipline distinct from other fields with which it had traditionally been associated (theurgy and philosophy), thus establishing medicine as a profession.

Hippocrates is credited with being the first person to believe that diseases were caused naturally, not because of superstition and gods. Hippocrates was credited by the disciples of Pythagoras of allying philosophy and medicine. He separated the discipline of medicine from religion, believing and arguing that disease was not a punishment inflicted by the gods but rather the product of environmental factors, diet, and living habits. Indeed there is not a single mention of a mystical illness in the entirety of the Hippocratic Corpus. However, Hippocrates did work with many convictions that were based on what is now known to be incorrect anatomy and physiology, such as Humorism.

Source: Wikipedia

Prince, master of rock, soul, pop and funk, dies at 57

Prince | 1958 – 2016
August Brown and Josh Rottenberg
L.A. Times Contact Reporters
article published Saturday April 23, 2016

Prince

At the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony in 2004, Prince walked on stage with fellow rock legends Tom Petty, Jeff Lynne and others to pay tribute to the late George Harrison with a cover of the Beatles’ “While My Guitar Gently Weeps.”

Dressed in a red hat and matching shirt unbuttoned to his stomach, Prince took the song’s final solo — burning through riff after riff of instrumental fireworks. Then he threw his guitar over his head and walked offstage without saying a word.

In a room of legends, Prince still had no equal. A sexual boundary pusher and devout Jehovah’s Witness, he was our first post-everything pop star, defying easy categories of race, genre and commercial appeal.

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The search for circulating epilepsy biomarkers.

by Hegde M1, Lowenstein DH.

1UCSF Epilepsy Center, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, 521 Parnassus Avenue C-440, San Francisco, CA 94143-0138, USA

Abstract

Few would experience greater benefit from the development of biomarkers than those who suffer from epilepsy. Both the timing of individual seizures and the overall course of the disease are highly unpredictable, and the associated morbidity is considerable. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop biomarkers that can predict the progression of epilepsy and treatment response. Doing so may also shed light on the mechanisms of epileptogenesis and pharmacoresistance, which remain elusive despite decades of study. However, recent advances suggest the possible identification of circulating epilepsy biomarkers – accessible in blood, cerebrospinal fluid or urine. In this review, we focus on advances in several areas: neuroimmunology and inflammation; neurological viral infection; exemplary pediatric syndromes; and the genetics of pharmacoresistance, as relevant to epilepsy. These are fertile areas of study with great potential to yield accessible epilepsy biomarkers.

Background
For decades, the care of epilepsy patients has been limited by a paucity of biomarkers. There have been few indicators of disease progression or remission, aside from the rates of seizures themselves. Even seizure frequency has proven suboptimal, as patients may be amnestic for their seizures, or seizure manifestations may be subclinical. In fact, until recently, the primary tool used for prognostication in newly diagnosed epilepsy has been the electroencephalogram – a venerable test first used clinically by the pioneering German neurophysiologist Hans Berger in 1924. Since then, advances in imaging have allowed identification of lesions that confer an increased risk of seizures, such as mesial temporal sclerosis, vascular malformations and focal cortical dysplasia. The advent of 3T MRI promises to improve our sensitivity in this arena even further. However, these advances are insufficient to meet the level of uncertainty that face both clinician and patient during counseling after a first unprovoked seizure.

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Coach Jerry Kill

University of Minnesota head football coach Jerry Kill resigned his position on Oct. 28, 2015, due to health reasons. Kill is stepping away from college football with a career record of 156-102 and a 29-29 mark at Minnesota.

Kill was named Minnesota’s head coach on Dec. 7, 2010, and took the Gophers to heights not seen in recent years. Last season, Kill led Minnesota to a January 1 bowl game for the first time since 1962 and coached the Gophers to wins against Michigan and Iowa, which had previously not happened in the same season since 1967. Under Kill’s direction, Minnesota also erased a 14-point halftime deficit at Nebraska to beat the ranked Huskers on the road for the first time since 1960. Minnesota won eight games in both 2013 and 2014, which marked only the fifth time since 1906 that Minnesota won eight games in consecutive seasons.

The Gophers were 3-9 in Kill’s first season in 2011, but reached a bowl game and finished 6-7 in 2012. As custom with Kill and his staff, the third year at a school usually turns into a memorable season and 2013 was no different at Minnesota as the Gophers finished the season with an 8-5 overall record and a 4-4 mark in conference play. Kill was a combined 9-26 in his first year at Minnesota and at his previous two schools Northern Illinois (NIU) and Southern Illinois (SIU). In his third year, the schools produced a combined record of 28-9.

The success from 2013 carried over into 2014, as Kill’s Gophers finished 8-5 overall, but were 5-3 in the Big Ten. Kill guided Minnesota to its first back-to-back eight-win seasons since 2002 (eight wins) and 2003 (10 wins). Since 1906, Minnesota has won eight games in consecutive seasons only five times. The 2013 and 2014 seasons were Minnesota’s first consecutive four-win conference seasons since 1999 (5-3) and 2000 (4-4).

In 2014, Kill coached the Gophers to resounding wins against rivals Michigan (30-14) and Iowa (51-14) to claim the Little Brown Jug and Floyd of Rosedale. Last season marked the first time that Minnesota had beaten Michigan and Iowa in the same season since 1967. Under Kill’s direction, Minnesota also erased a 14-point halftime deficit at Nebraska to beat the ranked Huskers on the road for the first time since 1960.

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Patrick Reed and Wife Justine are the PGA Tour’s Dream Team

by Alan Shipnuck
Posted: Thu Feb. 5, 2015 on Golf.com
Patrick Reed is not a villain, but he plays one on TV.

 

Justine gave up Patrick's bag with the arrival of Windsor-Wells, but ever the competitor, she still plots strategy with her man and is quick with a swing critique.

Justine gave up Patrick’s bag with the arrival of Windsor-Wells, but ever the competitor, she still plots strategy with her man and is quick with a swing critique. Photo: Kohjiro Kinno/SI

PatrickReedTeeShot

Photo: Kohjiro Kinno/SI

In 2014, Reed proved he is really good at two things: winning golf tournaments and ticking people off. It started last March at Doral, where he beat a world-class field and then crowed in front of God and Johnny Miller that he should be considered a top five player. Reed, 23 at the time, had a pretty convincing case: It was his third victory in seven months. But golf is not a sport that smiles upon the self-aggrandizing, and Reed was mocked on social media and PGA Tour driving ranges. Then in September at the Ryder Cup, Reed morphed into a full-blown Danny Ainge—a player you love to hate, especially if you’re one of the 743 million Europeans. In a taut singles match against Henrik Stenson at Gleneagles in Scotland, Reed, after a birdie at the 7th hole, put his fingers to his lips to shush the partisan crowd. All told, he would make eight crowd-quieting birdies, including one on the final hole to win the match, set up by what he calls “the best 3-iron of my life.” At a World Golf Championship event in China in November, Reed missed a short putt and unleashed a profane rant that included a homophobic slur, which was broadcast around the world. The invective was directed only at himself, but the incident furthered the belief that Reed might not be fully in control of his instrument.

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