Otto Fritz Meyerhof

Taken from Wikipedia

Otto Fritz Meyerhof  (April 12, 1884 – October 6, 1951), was a German physician and biochemist.

Otto_Fritz_MeyerhofOtto Fritz Meyerhof was born in Hannover, the son of wealthy Jewish parents. In 1888, his family moved to Berlin, where Otto spent most of his childhood, and where he started his study of medicine. He continued these studies in Strasbourg and Heidelberg, from which he graduated in 1909, with a work titled “Contributions to the Psychological Theory of Mental Illness”.

In 1912, he moved to the University of Kiel, where he became professor in 1918. Known for the relationship between the consumption of oxygen and the metabolism of lactic acid in the muscle, in 1922, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine, with Archibald Vivian Hill, for his work on muscle metabolism, including glycolysis. In 1929 he became one of the directors of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Medical Research, a position he held until 1938. Fleeing the Nazi regime, he moved to Paris in 1938. He then moved to the United States in 1940, where he became a guest professor at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

Meyerhof died in Philadelphia at the age of 67.

Notable awards:
Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 1922
Fellow of the Royal Society

Louis Pasteur

Taken from Wikipedia

Louis_PasteurLouis Pasteur, (December 27, 1822 – September 28, 1895), was a 19th century French chemist and microbiologist renowned for his discoveries of the principles of vaccination, microbial fermentation and pasteurization. He is remembered for his remarkable breakthroughs in the causes and preventions of diseases, and his discoveries have saved countless lives ever since. He reduced mortality from puerperal fever, and created the first vaccines for rabies and anthrax. His medical discoveries provided direct support for the germ theory of disease and its application in clinical medicine. He is best known to the general public for his invention of the technique of treating milk and wine to stop bacterial contamination, a process now called pasteurization. He is regarded as one of the three main founders of bacteriology, together with Ferdinand Cohn and Robert Koch, and is popularly known as the “father of microbiology”.

Pasteur was responsible for disproving the doctrine of spontaneous generation. He performed experiments that showed that without contamination, microorganisms could not develop. Under the auspices of the French Academy of Sciences, he demonstrated that in sterilized and sealed flasks nothing ever developed, and in sterilized but open flasks microorganisms could grow. This experiment won him the Alhumbert Prize of the academy.

Although Pasteur was not the first to propose the germ theory, he developed it and conducted experiments that clearly indicated its correctness and managed to convince most of Europe that it was true. (He was preceded by Girolamo Fracastoro, Agostino Bassi and others, with the significant experimental demonstration by Francesco Redi in the 17th century.) Today, he is often regarded as (one of the) fathers of germ theory.

Pasteur also made significant discoveries in chemistry, most notably on the molecular basis for the asymmetry of certain crystals and racemization. Early in his career, his investigation of tartaric acid resulted in the first resolution of what we now call optical isomers. His work led the way to our current understanding of a fundamental principal in the structure of organic compounds.

He was the director of the Pasteur Institute, established in 1887, till his death, and his body lies beneath the institute in a vault covered in depictions of his accomplishments in Byzantine mosaics.

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Seizure Led to FloJo’s Death

Autopsy: Olympic sprint champion suffocated in bedding after having epileptic event in her sleep. October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB | TIMES STAFF WRITER

For the record:
Olympics–Florence Griffith Joyner, was one of two women to have won four medals in track and field in the same Olympics. Fanny Blankers-Koen of Holland won the 100- and 200-meter sprints, the 80-meter hurdles and anchored the victorious 400 relay team in the 1948 Olympics in London.

Florence Griffith Joyner

Florence Griffith Joyner

Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38.

Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.

“My wife took the final, ultimate drug test,” Joyner said, choking back tears during a brief news conference after the release of the autopsy. “And it’s what we always said: There’s nothing there. So please, please, give us time to grieve and just let my wife rest in peace.”

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Men With Pelvic Pain Find a Path to Treatment Blocked by a Gynecology Board

By DENISE GRADY
Published: December 10, 2013
Rajah Bose for The New York Times Dr. Daniel Davidson, an Idaho dentist, has pelvic pain so severe that he cannot sit, and can stand for only limited periods.

Photo by Rajah Bose for The New York Times
Dr. Daniel Davidson, an Idaho dentist, has pelvic pain so severe that he cannot sit, and can stand for only limited periods.

After visiting dozens of doctors and suffering for nearly five years from pelvic pain so severe that he could not work, Daniel Davidson, 57, a dentist in Dalton Gardens, Idaho, finally found a specialist in Phoenix who had an outstanding reputation for treating men like him.

Dr. Davidson, whose pain followed an injury, waited five months for an appointment and even rented an apartment in Phoenix, assuming he would need surgery and time to recover.

Six days before the appointment, it was canceled. The doctor, Michael Hibner, an obstetrician-gynecologist at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, had learned that members of his specialty were not allowed to treat men and that if he did so, he could lose his board certification — something that doctors need in order to work.

The rule had come from the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology. On Sept. 12, it posted on its website a newly stringent and explicit statement of what its members could and could not do. Except for a few conditions, gynecologists were prohibited from treating men. Pelvic pain was not among the exceptions.

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Engineer ‘nodded’ before NYC train wreck

In this photo taken on Sunday, Dec. 1, 2013, Metro North Railroad engineer William Rockefeller is wheeled on a stretcher away from the area where the commuter train he was operating derailed in the Bronx borough of New York. The National Transportation Safety Board reported Monday that the train Rockefeller was driving was going 82 mph around a 30-mph curve when it derailed killing four people and injuring more than 60. (AP Photo/Robert Stolarik)

In this photo taken on Sunday, Dec. 1, 2013, Metro North Railroad engineer William Rockefeller is wheeled on a stretcher away from the area where the commuter train he was operating derailed in the Bronx borough of New York. The National Transportation Safety Board reported Monday that the train Rockefeller was driving was going 82 mph around a 30-mph curve when it derailed killing four people and injuring more than 60. (AP Photo/Robert Stolarik)

BY JIM FITZGERALD & TOM HAYS – ASSOCIATED PRESS
December 3, 2013, 12:59 PM

NEW YORK — The engineer in the commuter-train derailment that killed four people over the weekend caught himself nodding at the controls just before the wreck, a union official said Tuesday.

William Rockefeller “caught himself, but he caught himself too late,” said Anthony Bottalico, leader of the rail employees union, relating what he said Rockfeller told him.

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